Who Let the Nerd Sit at the Cool Table?

I was never the most popular or most liked kid in school.

But the one thing I always had going for myself was the ability to use my talents and gifts to gain the attention and respect of others. Most times I felt like a nerd amongst kids who were way cooler than me. Somehow as an accomplished and confident adult, I still feel that way.

The thing is I listen and observe most of time and talk only when I have something of substance to say. On the contrary, most of the cool kids were talkative, funny and “in your face” charming. My humble attributes were too often taken for being shy, withdrawn or overly serious.

There are so many perks in the public relations industry. You meet people with great connections, attend exclusive events, engage in endless networking and enjoy an abundance of complimentary favors. You find yourself surrounded by the perceived in-crowd.

Seems like you’ve finally become one of the cool kids but you’re inner nerd is still lingering. The one reason you aren’t as popular is because you have other things to think about. You’re distant because your mind is on business. You’re quiet because you’re silently and effortlessly strategizing how to beat everyone else at their own game. You’re focused because you’re thinking of your next master plan.

The good thing about PR is that most people think they need it because they’re always looking for a way to gain more exposure for what they do. And, no matter how socially awkward or intellectually complex you may seem, you possess the know-how of making other people popular.

So why don’t nerds make themselves popular?

Because nerds exist to make the cool kids look even cooler. Sometimes we can even make other nerds look cool.

Remember as a PR pro, the client is the star of the show. Will you ever get a little shine? Absolutely. The obscure knowledge of PR keeps you in demand. But most times you’ll be the nerd at the cool table. You’ll always have a reserved seat there because cool kids know that while they play the superstar role and ham the spotlight, you’re somewhere concentrating on the next move.

Reality Checkpoints for Athletes

With football season now over and basketball season about to climb to its peak, sports fans couldn’t be more excited.The thrill it brings with each year continues prove the sports industry to be one of the powerful agents of media culture. But the public’s interest spans further than touchdowns and championship trophies.

More than ever before, pro athletes are increasingly seen as celebrities, stars and ballers but known less for their power plays on the field. Sure, that’s great branding for name recognition but how many players can you name but have no idea what team the guy plays for? More importantly, at what moment did you learn or remember his name – during a hot media crisis buzzing amid the news or after reading a good magazine article about his journey to the pros?

realitycheck21

The reality is athletes aren’t hard to brand. Their public relations efforts are made simple by their league and team affiliations. Take the media legend of Terrell ‘T.O.’ Owens for instance. Though he grew into some rather unfavorable moments while becoming one of the most outspoken and unpredictable players in the NFL, T.O. has weathered the storm. The Dallas Cowboys’ receiver is getting his own reality show on VH1 this summer showing what life off the field is like. Kudos to his publicists Monique Jackson and Kita Williams tasked with the taming of success.

Not every athlete will have a shot at a reality show. Not every athlete wants their daily life off the field to be peered into. Not every athlete will face public crisis or turmoil. Nonetheless, the responsibility for athletes to manage their image very carefully couldn’t be greater.

Here are three reality checkpoints of PR for athletes:reailtycheck1

First, realize that the sports industry has gone far beyond just getting in the game. PR is a must. Athletes have to study both games and acknowledge their strengths and weaknesses. Knowing this firsthand will help them tackle their seasons with success.

Second, work hard. Hard work never kills but it pays.
If you’re an all-around hardworking guy, you will surely make progress in your career. This will make people respect and see you as an icon. Hardwork includes going to practice on time and as well as maintaining your character in front of the public.

Third, humble yourself and be disciplined.
This is one of the greatest assets of success. Remember, its public relations, the art of relating to the public and it requires you to be in touch with who you are as player and a person.

Prep Your Rep

Who knew the social media movement would be such a trendy yet powerful tool? If you’ve ever “Googled” yourself or your business, you must be aware that you now you have an online reputation. It’s not the type of reputation based on what others say about you like maybe after they’ve met you or got word about your business. It’s the kind you create. prep-your-rep

An online reputation is based your online activity. The sites you frequent, the comments your post, the blogs you write, the tweets you Twitter – they make up your online reputation.
Your professional rep, and sometimes your personal one, can be identified and judged through online content and essentially defines what type of business person you are.

Prepare yourself to define an online reputation. Your rep is re-established every time you log-in or click a mouse. If you dedicate time to joining social media sites or writing a regular blog column, think about the outcome of what you plan to achieve in the long run. Ask yourself, “How do I want to be remembered?” or “Will this affect my business identity or ability to generate revenue?”

An online reputation is mandatory for survival but a bad one can turn away future customers, clients, employers and business partners. You don’t have to jump on the bandwagon of every new social media trend. Use what’s best for you and your business.

Take to time to prep your rep and make it a good one.