Content vs. Channels

Growing up, my mother used to tell me, “It’scontent vs channels not what you say, it’s how you say it.” She was right. The “how” she was referring to is the tone of the message and the way it’s delivered to and perceived by the receiver. When you want to tell the world your story, you need to have a strategy to engage audiences and a plan to distribute your message in ways that get the response you desire.

During my educator fellowship at Johnson & Johnson, I discovered multiple internal communication channels with highly valuable content perfectly crafted for specific audiences. I had the chance to learn about how J&J places content into certain channels from long-time J&J employee and corporate communication director Melody Meade, who is responsible for developing creative and strategic messages for IT. We had a great conversation about leveraging content to get the best engagement from an audience. Companies large and small are facing an influx of messages to share and the decision of which channels to utilize that will make messages resonate and keep the interest of audiences.

What’s the best way to keep audiences engaged? Should we re-evaluate our content strategies or should we create new or improved channels? The answer is yes to both.

The best content engagement strategies are those that fully consider what and how, along with who, where, when, and why. The key to gaining greater engagement is to re-evaluate content regularly and assess the opportunity to create new channels that fit the uses of audiences. The perceived short attention span of our society is tempered by interesting content. If the content is great and meets the audience through a channel they value, your organization is poised to win.

 Here’s a short list of questions to ask when trying to plan or assess your content engagement strategy:

  •  What would we like audiences to know?
  • How should we tell them? What channels should we consider?
  • Who should we tell? Who are our target audiences for this specific message?
  • Where should we send the message to reach them best? How valuable is this method to our audiences? Does it allow them to share the message?
  • When should we tell them? How frequently?
  • Why should they care? How will we track and measure their responses/feedback?

Your content strategy defines your channel strategy. Many organizations craft content and place it in different channels without taking a real assessment of the type of content living in them. When content engagement drops or flattens, it’s time to rethink your channel strategy and determine what channels (web, social, email, etc.) are being used for distribution in order to re- purpose the content you have and set a new standard for what success looks like. (I will speak more about channel planning in a later post.

Content and channels shouldn’t be at war against themselves. In brand messaging, the content sits as king, while the channel is queen. They reign together and can’t be successful in the battle alone. Content makes magic in channels when planned and placed strategically. Crafting worthwhile content and keeping channel distribution diverse go hand-in-hand.

The more we evaluate our strategies, the more we discover that the best content sparks dialogue and strengthens relationships between organizations and their audiences.

(This post is part of a series written during a four-week project in corporate communication at Johnson & Johnson through the Plank Center Fellowship program.)

PR Pros Should Do Good & Be Well

Last month, I worked with a personal trainer. I knew my upcoming four-week stay at Johnson & Johnson was going to come with a slight adjustment to my regular exercise routine back home in Nashville. I know how travel can cause major setbacks for healthy dieting and exercising. More than anything, I know that having a balanced life is a major ingredient for handling the stress that comes with a career in public relations. Exercise is one of the necessary must-haves for me as I fight daily fires and face complicated dilemmas.

To prepare mentally and physically for the work ahead, I did strength training with heavy weights at low reps for 3-5 sets, 15-30 minutes of high-intensity interval (HIIT) cardio and timed full-body circuits three days a week at 7 a.m. for an hour. The other four days of the week, I was instructed to do 30 minutes of HIIT cardio for two days and take the other two for rest.

Once I arrived at J&J, I learned about the “Do Good, Be Well” program and the communication strategy created to support it. The initiative links like-minded fitness enthusiasts to volunteer and participate in charitable activities that make a difference in the community such as biking, running, swimming, hiking, walking and playing team sports. The employee platform is an internal initiative that connects to an online community to recruit team members for events, post goals and share success stories. As a component of “Do Good, Be Well,” 500 Johnson & Johnson employees recently teamed up at the TriRock Philadelphia Triathlon to raise more than $250,000 for the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. It’s the perfect reminder to stay active and commit to giving.

So often, working in public relations can take you away from living a happy and healthy personal life and inspiring others to do so.

Our stresses often come with second guessing deliverables, asking “is this what the client wants?” and ending up with mismatched results and mismanaged expectations. We find ourselves over-committing or overcompensating to frantically find a solution.

Our stresses can derive from budget problems. Internal mismanagement, nonexistent ranges on accounts, and lack of access can cause frustration with client relations or interruption in account services.

Our stresses are many times the result of mounting or overlapping deadlines. The pressures of delivering a quality product at a moment’s notice, responding to a crisis or pulling multiple all-nighters add up and may impact our ability to function properly.

Our stresses can develop from the perfection myth that exists in the PR industry. If media doesn’t cover a story, an event starts five minutes behind schedule or – God forbid – a typo is found in a campaign piece (gasp), the entire effort can feel worthless.

These things and more are issues PR pros cannot always control but we can control our response. We can manage our time in ways that allow us the freedom to make room for things that give us balance.

After an intense workout during week two of my stay at J&J

After an intense workout during week two of my stay at J&J

Instead of sitting at the computer all day or working through free time, ‘do good’ by volunteering at your favorite local charity’s big event or enlisting your company to sponsor a community health fair; ‘be well’ by adding a quick 30-minute workout to your calendar two to three days a week or walking in an upcoming 5k hosted by an organization you support.

As PR pros, we are brand advocates. Organizations depend on our expertise and knowledge. If we are to be champions for their cause, we must make our own health and well-being a priority.

 

(This post is part of a series written during a four-week project in corporate communication at Johnson & Johnson through the Plank Center Fellowship program.)

A Commitment to the Credo

The work of building strong brands and profitable companies begins from within.aerialellis -johnsonandjohnson -plankcenterfellowship Walking into the world headquarters of Johnson & Johnson to begin a month-long project in communication, diversity and innovation, I instantly sensed a spirit of integrity. The globally recognized brand has a set of beliefs called “Our Credo.” These beliefs are embedded in the J&J workforce. I read and researched the Credo in preparation for my stay there. Upon my arrival, I couldn’t help but notice the Credo printed, mounted and framed in variations along the walls and halls of the building. More importantly, I found evidence of the Credo in the conversations and interactions with J&J employees. It soon became apparent that the Credo is more than words – it’s a living definition of the J&J culture.

More than 70 years ago, J&J Founder Robert Wood Johnson formalized consumers, employees, communities and stockholders alike.

A sign of effective communication is when a strategic message is adopted within an organization to establish the foundation for a healthy internal environment and then translates externally through work performance and relationships. These original mantras help employees make inspired and informed key decisions and actions. They also present values that provide direction and guidance for ethical practices.

imgres-3 As the company culture evolved, Johnson & Johnson acknowledged the role of the individual and the organization in balancing work/family responsibilities. They took another look at the beloved Credo, framed it in the context of today’s business world and reaffirmed its relevance in an ever-changing environment. Last year, J&J created a website to share the Credo through stories, videos and photos across its global community of approximately 128,700 employees in more than 60 countries.

 

This multi-platform strategy allowed employees to have an open dialogue about the Credo with leaders of the organization. Leaders conducted sessions for their team members with the help of a full toolkit to prepare, facilitate and guide the conversations, along with activities for interaction and reflection that included case studies, sample messages and decision-making resources. Employees were given opportunities to share personal stories of the Credo in action, explore conflicts and dilemmas that may arise and the responses needed to resolve them, and reflect on how the Credo influences and impacts communication. Each employee of J&J signed the Credo as a symbol of their personal commitment to the company’s guiding principles and in demonstration of the values in daily action.

This form of communication, with its supporting tactics, creates employees who become unbeatable brand ambassadors – both on and off the clock. It greatly influences a company’s culture, which then plays a role in a company’s brand reputation. The public often develops their perceptions of a company from more than tweets, press releases and advertisements. Its employees are the face of the brand and often impact how the public hears, sees and perceives an organization.

The Credo is an effective communication tool because it proves that J&J recognizes and supports the need to evolve and provide context to big picture messaging that gives meaning to day-to-day exchanges and experiences. It shows communication through deliberate messages, actions and policies in a proactive interpretation of the core values. Together, J&J and its Credo create a communication climate that inevitably reflects a positive organizational culture.

 

(This post is part of a series written during a four-week project in corporate communication at Johnson & Johnson through the Plank Center Fellowship program.)