PR Pros Should Do Good & Be Well

Last month, I worked with a personal trainer. I knew my upcoming four-week stay at Johnson & Johnson was going to come with a slight adjustment to my regular exercise routine back home in Nashville. I know how travel can cause major setbacks for healthy dieting and exercising. More than anything, I know that having a balanced life is a major ingredient for handling the stress that comes with a career in public relations. Exercise is one of the necessary must-haves for me as I fight daily fires and face complicated dilemmas.

To prepare mentally and physically for the work ahead, I did strength training with heavy weights at low reps for 3-5 sets, 15-30 minutes of high-intensity interval (HIIT) cardio and timed full-body circuits three days a week at 7 a.m. for an hour. The other four days of the week, I was instructed to do 30 minutes of HIIT cardio for two days and take the other two for rest.

Once I arrived at J&J, I learned about the “Do Good, Be Well” program and the communication strategy created to support it. The initiative links like-minded fitness enthusiasts to volunteer and participate in charitable activities that make a difference in the community such as biking, running, swimming, hiking, walking and playing team sports. The employee platform is an internal initiative that connects to an online community to recruit team members for events, post goals and share success stories. As a component of “Do Good, Be Well,” 500 Johnson & Johnson employees recently teamed up at the TriRock Philadelphia Triathlon to raise more than $250,000 for the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. It’s the perfect reminder to stay active and commit to giving.

So often, working in public relations can take you away from living a happy and healthy personal life and inspiring others to do so.

Our stresses often come with second guessing deliverables, asking “is this what the client wants?” and ending up with mismatched results and mismanaged expectations. We find ourselves over-committing or overcompensating to frantically find a solution.

Our stresses can derive from budget problems. Internal mismanagement, nonexistent ranges on accounts, and lack of access can cause frustration with client relations or interruption in account services.

Our stresses are many times the result of mounting or overlapping deadlines. The pressures of delivering a quality product at a moment’s notice, responding to a crisis or pulling multiple all-nighters add up and may impact our ability to function properly.

Our stresses can develop from the perfection myth that exists in the PR industry. If media doesn’t cover a story, an event starts five minutes behind schedule or – God forbid – a typo is found in a campaign piece (gasp), the entire effort can feel worthless.

These things and more are issues PR pros cannot always control but we can control our response. We can manage our time in ways that allow us the freedom to make room for things that give us balance.

After an intense workout during week two of my stay at J&J

After an intense workout during week two of my stay at J&J

Instead of sitting at the computer all day or working through free time, ‘do good’ by volunteering at your favorite local charity’s big event or enlisting your company to sponsor a community health fair; ‘be well’ by adding a quick 30-minute workout to your calendar two to three days a week or walking in an upcoming 5k hosted by an organization you support.

As PR pros, we are brand advocates. Organizations depend on our expertise and knowledge. If we are to be champions for their cause, we must make our own health and well-being a priority.

 

(This post is part of a series written during a four-week project in corporate communication at Johnson & Johnson through the Plank Center Fellowship program.)

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